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Diabetes Experts Release New Guidelines on Managing Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Experts Release New Guidelines on Managing Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes
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Diabetes Experts Release New Guidelines on Managing Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes

OCT 05, 2018- UNC HEALTH CARE –

New recommendations, co-written by UNC School of Medicine’s John Buse, MD, PhD, cover the type of drugs patients should be prescribed and how providers can better help patients manage their health.

BERLIN – The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have produced an updated consensus statement on how to manage hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar) in patients with type 2 diabetes. The consensus paper is being published in the EASD’s journal, Diabetologia, and the ADA’s journal, Diabetes Care. This publication coincides with the EASD annual meeting in Berlin, Germany.

The new recommendations from an expert panel of EASD and ADA members follow a review of the latest evidence — including a range of recent trials of drug and lifestyle intervention — and update the last recommendations issued in 2015.

UNC School of Medicine’s John Buse, MD, PhD, senior author of the paper and co-chair of the ADA consensus statement writing group, says there are two key changes in the updated recommendations.

“We have suggested changing the focus of why drugs are prescribed to patients. Instead of primarily focusing on lowering blood sugar, we now suggest physicians primarily focus on treatment to prevent heart attack, stroke, heart failure and kidney disease,” said Buse, director of the UNC Diabetes Care Center and director of the NC Translational and Clinical Sciences (NC TraCS) Institute.

The new recommendations say type 2 diabetes patients with clinical cardiovascular disease should take a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist or sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor. Buse says they also now recommend that if a patient needs to take an injection, they should start with a GLP-1 receptor agonist instead of insulin, which has been the classical approach. There is also more focus on diet, weight loss medications, and weight loss surgery as strategies for diabetes control.

“Less than 20 percent of patients in the U.S. are getting the recommended treatments,” Buse said. “I do not know how much these new recommendations will change provider behavior or insurance coverage, but we…

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